Strain Measurement With Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) Resonators

The subject of strain measurement has previously been addressed extensively. Most of the existing transducers either rely on low voltage analogue systems (e.g. conventional resistive strain gauge), complicated mechanical assemblies by physically assessing the specimen displacement, optical systems, acoustic systems or pneumatic systems.

This paper identifies a new, potentially low cost, non-contact, frequency domain strain sensor utilising SAW (Surface Acoustic Wave) Technology for surface strain measurement. The sensor has a short axial length making it flexible in terms of integration into a variety of applications, encompassing both static and dynamic strain measurement. The paper presents a technical description of the resulting strain transducer, regarding its operation, construction and in particularly, application to areas requiring strain measurement. Demonstration of the transducer performance will be addressed utilising test results from existing developed transducers.

Improved Performance Of Motor-Drive Systems By Saw Shaft Torque Feedback

The paper describes the application of a non-contact, high bandwidth, low cost, SAW-based torque measuring system for improving the dynamic performance of industrial process motor-drive systems. Background to the SAW technology and its motor integration is discussed and a resonance ratio control (RRC) technique for the coordinated motion control of multi-inertia mechanical systems, based on the measurement of shaft torque via a SAW-based torque sensor is proposed. Furthermore, a new controller structure, RRC plus disturbance feedback is proposed, which enables the controller to be designed to independently satisfy tracking and regulation performance. A tuning method for the RRC structure is given based on the ITAE index, normalized as a function of the mechanical parameters enabling a direct performance comparison between a basic proportional and integral (PI) controller. The use of a reduced-order state observer is presented to provide a dynamic estimate of the load-side disturbance torque for a multi-inertia mechanical system, with an appraisal of the composite closed-loop dynamics. The control structures are experimentally validated and demonstrate significant improvement in dynamic tracking performance, whilst additionally rejecting periodic load side disturbances, a feature previously unrealisable except by other, high-gain control schemes that impose small stability margins.

Dynamic rotary torque measurement Using surface acoustic waves

The subject of torque measurement has previously been addressed extensively. Most of the existing transducers either rely on low voltage analogue systems (e.g. conventional resistive strain gauge) or complicated mechanical assemblies by physically assessing displacement, i.e. optical systems. This paper identifies a new, potentially low cost, non-contact, frequency domain strain torque sensor1 utilising SAW (Surface Acoustic Wave) Technology for surface strain measurement. The sensor has a short axial length making it flexible in terms of integration into a variety of applications, encompassing both static and dynamic measurement. The paper presents a technical description of the resulting transducer, regarding its operation and construction.

Acoustic Wave Technology Sensors

Acoustic wave sensors are extremely versatile devices that are just beginning to realize their commercial potential. This tutorial addresses acoustic wave sensor physics and materials, and the various types of acoustic wave sensors and their industrial applications.

Bill Drafts
Acoustic wave devices have been in commercial use for more than 60 years. The telecommunications industry is the largest consumer, accounting for ~3 billion acoustic wave filters annually, primarily in mobile cell phones and base stations. These are typically surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, and act as bandpass filters in both the radio frequency and intermediate frequency sections of the transceiver electronics. Several of the emerging applications for acoustic wave devices as sensors may eventually equal the demand of the telecommunications market. These include automotive applications (torque and tire pressure sensors), medical applications (chemical sensors), and industrial and commercial applications (vapor, humidity, temperature, and mass sensors). Acoustic wave sensors are competitively priced, inherently rugged, very sensitive, and intrinsically reliable. Some are also capable of being passively and wirelessly interrogated (no sensor power source required).